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New Year, New You: A Comprehensive Guide to Resolutions That Last

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Are you ready to make 2024 your best year ever? Do you want to start the new year with a new you?

If so, you are not alone. Millions of people around the world set New Year’s resolutions every year, hoping to improve their health, happiness, productivity, or creativity.

However, setting resolutions is easy. Keeping them is hard. According to a study by the University of Scranton, only 8% of people who make resolutions actually achieve them. The rest either give up or forget about them within a few weeks or months.

Why is it so difficult to stick to our resolutions? What can we do to increase our chances of success? How can we make resolutions that last?

In this article, we will provide you with a comprehensive guide to help you set and keep your resolutions. We will share with you 10 science-backed tips and strategies that will help you overcome the common challenges and pitfalls that prevent you from achieving your goals. We will also give you some examples, stories, statistics, and resources to inspire and motivate you along the way.

By the end of this article, you will have a clear and effective plan to make your resolutions a reality. You will also have a better understanding of yourself and your potential. You will be ready to start the new year with a new you.

Read on and take action today.

Unlock your resolution success with the perfect companion! Explore this exclusive journal designed to help you achieve your goals effortlessly. Click here to grab yours now and turn your resolutions into reality!
 
NORSE WISDOM
QUOTES JOURNAL 


1. 10 Tips for Setting and Keeping Resolutions

Here are 10 tips or strategies to help you set and keep your resolutions:


1.1 Be picky about your resolutions, and choose one or two that are most important to you.

  • Don’t try to change everything at once. Focus on the areas of your life that need the most improvement or that matter the most to you. For example, if you want to improve your health, you might choose to quit smoking or lose weight. If you want to improve your happiness, you might choose to spend more time with your family or friends. If you want to improve your productivity, you might choose to finish a project or learn a new skill. Choosing one or two resolutions will help you concentrate your efforts and resources and avoid feeling overwhelmed or distracted.
    • Example: Lisa wanted to make several changes in her life, such as eating healthier, exercising more, saving money, reading more books, and learning Spanish. She tried to do them all at the same time, but soon realized that it was too much to handle. She felt stressed and frustrated, and ended up abandoning all of her resolutions. She decided to start over and focus on one resolution at a time. She chose to eat healthier first, because it was the most important and urgent for her health. She made a plan to eat more fruits and vegetables, cut down on junk food and sugar, and drink more water. She stuck to her plan, and she noticed that she felt better and had more energy. She also lost some weight and improved her blood pressure. She was proud of her achievement and motivated to continue. She then moved on to her next resolution, which was to exercise more.
    • Statistic: According to a survey by Statista, the most common New Year’s resolutions in 2023 were to exercise more (54%), eat healthier (49%), save money (41%), and lose weight (38%).

 

1.2 Be specific and measurable about your resolutions and break them down into smaller and achievable steps.

 
  • Don’t set vague or unrealistic resolutions that are hard to define or track. For example, instead of saying “I want to be healthier”, say “I want to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables every day for three months”. Instead of saying “I want to save money”, say “I want to save $100 every month”. Instead of saying “I want to learn Spanish”, say “I want to complete a Spanish course online”. Being specific and measurable will help you clarify your expectations and outcomes, and monitor your progress and results.
    • Example: James wanted to learn Spanish, but he didn’t have a clear or realistic goal. He just said “I want to learn Spanish” and bought some books and apps. He didn’t have a plan or a schedule, and he didn’t know how to measure his improvement. He soon lost interest and motivation and gave up on his resolution. He decided to start over and set a specific and measurable goal. He said “I want to complete a Spanish course online in six months”. He researched and found a reputable and affordable online course that suited his level and needs. He made a plan to study for an hour every day, and to take a test every week. He tracked his progress and results, and celebrated his achievements. He was excited and determined to finish his course and learn Spanish.
    • Statistic: According to a study by Dominican University of California, people who wrote down their goals were 42% more likely to achieve them than those who did not.

 

1.3 Plan ahead and anticipate the obstacles and temptations that might derail your progress. 

 
  • Don’t rely on your willpower or motivation alone. They are not enough to sustain your resolution, especially when you face difficulties or distractions. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might encounter triggers such as stress, boredom, or social pressure. If you want to lose weight, you might encounter temptations such as junk food, parties, or holidays. If you want to finish a project, you might encounter challenges such as procrastination, interruptions, or technical issues. Planning ahead and anticipating the obstacles and temptations will help you prepare and cope with them, and avoid giving up or giving in.
    • Example: Maria wanted to quit smoking, but she didn’t have a plan or a strategy. She just said “I want to quit smoking” and threw away her cigarettes. She didn’t think about the triggers or the cravings that might make her want to smoke again. She soon faced stress at work, boredom at home, and social pressure from her friends. She couldn’t resist and started smoking again. She decided to start over and plan ahead. She said “I want to quit smoking in three months”. She researched and found some methods and tools that could help her, such as nicotine patches, gum, or apps. She also identified and avoided her triggers, such as coffee, alcohol, or stressful situations. She also sought support from her family, friends, or online groups. She followed her plan and managed to quit smoking successfully.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the University of Pennsylvania, people who planned for possible setbacks were more likely to stick to their resolutions than those who did not.

 

1.4 Make a pros and cons list and remind yourself of the benefits and costs of your resolution. 

 
  • Don’t forget why you started your resolution in the first place. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might list the benefits such as saving money, improving your health, and setting a good example for your kids. You might also list the costs such as harming your lungs, staining your teeth, and smelling bad. If you want to lose weight, you might list the benefits such as feeling more confident, fitting into your clothes, and reducing your risk of diseases. You might also list the costs such as eating more calories, gaining more fat, and lowering your self-esteem. Making a pros and cons list and reminding yourself of the benefits and costs will help you stay motivated and focused, and resist the urge to quit or cheat.
    • Example: Kevin wanted to lose weight, but he didn’t have a clear or compelling reason. He just said “I want to lose weight” and joined a gym. He didn’t think about the benefits or the costs of his resolution. He soon lost interest and motivation, and stopped going to the gym. He decided to start over and make a pros and cons list. He said “I want to lose 10 pounds in three months”. He listed the benefits such as feeling more confident, fitting into his clothes, and reducing his risk of diseases. He also listed the costs such as eating more calories, gaining more fat, and lowering his self-esteem. He kept his list in a visible place and looked at it every day. He was inspired and determined to lose weight and achieve his goal.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the University of Exeter, people who focused on the benefits of their resolution were more likely to succeed than those who focused on the costs.

 

1.5 Talk about your resolution and seek support from friends, family, or online communities. 

 
  • Don’t keep your resolution a secret. Share it with others who can support you, encourage you, or hold you accountable. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might tell your friends, family, or coworkers, and ask them to help you or join you. If you want to lose weight, you might join a fitness class, a diet group, or an online forum, and exchange tips, experiences, or challenges with others. If you want to finish a project, you might find a mentor, a partner, or a coach, and get feedback, advice, or guidance from them. Talking about your resolution and seeking support from others will help you feel less alone and more connected, and boost your confidence and commitment.
    • Example: Sarah wanted to finish a project, but she didn’t have any support or guidance. She just said “I want to finish a project” and worked on it by herself. She didn’t share it with anyone or ask for any help. She soon faced some difficulties and doubts, and felt isolated and discouraged. She decided to start over and talk about her project. She said “I want to finish a project in two months”. She found a mentor who had experience and expertise in her field, and asked him to help her. She also found a partner who had a similar goal, and worked with him. She shared her project with them and got feedback, advice, and guidance from them. She felt more supported and confident, and finished her project successfully.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the American Society of Training and Development, people who had an accountability partner were 65% more likely to complete their goals than those who did not.
 


1.6 Reward yourself for your achievements and celebrate your milestones. 

 
  • Don’t forget to acknowledge and appreciate your efforts and results. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might reward yourself with a movie, a massage, or a new book every time you resist a craving or complete a week without smoking. If you want to lose weight, you might reward yourself with a new outfit, a spa day, or a vacation every time you lose a pound or reach a target weight. If you want to finish a project, you might reward yourself with a dinner, a concert, or a gift every time you complete a task or meet a deadline. Rewarding yourself for your achievements and celebrating your milestones will help you reinforce your positive behavior and maintain your enthusiasm and momentum.
    • Example: David wanted to finish a project, but he didn’t have any incentive or recognition. He just said “I want to finish a project” and worked on it without any breaks or rewards. He didn’t acknowledge or appreciate his efforts or results. He soon felt bored and burned out, and lost his passion and drive. He decided to start over and reward himself for his achievements. He said “I want to finish a project in one month”. He divided his project into four tasks, and set a deadline for each task. He rewarded himself with a dinner, a concert, or a gift every time he completed a task or met a deadline. He also celebrated his milestones with his friends, family, or mentor. He felt more incentivized and recognized, and finished his project with joy and pride.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the University of Chicago, people who received rewards for their performance were more likely to persist and improve than those who did not.
 


1.7 Track your progress and keep a journal or calendar to record your successes and challenges. 

 
  • Don’t ignore or forget how far you have come or how much you have left. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might track your progress and keep a journal or a calendar to record how many cigarettes you smoked, how much money you saved, and how you felt each day. If you want to lose weight, you might track your progress and keep a journal or a calendar to record your weight, your measurements, and your food intake each day. If you want to finish a project, you might track your progress and keep a journal or a calendar to record your tasks, your hours, and your feedback each day. Tracking your progress and keeping a journal or calendar will help you see your improvement and growth and identify your strengths and weaknesses.
    • Example: Amy wanted to lose weight, but she didn’t have any evidence or feedback. She just said “I want to lose weight” and followed a diet and exercise plan. She didn’t track her progress or keep a journal or a calendar. She didn’t know how much weight she lost, how much she ate, or how she exercised. She soon felt confused and doubtful, and wondered if she was doing it right or wrong. She decided to start over and track her progress and keep a journal or a calendar. She said “I want to lose 15 pounds in three months”. She weighed herself, measured herself, and took a picture of herself every week. She also recorded her food intake, her exercise routine, and her mood every day. She tracked her progress and kept a journal or a calendar to see her improvement and growth, and identify her strengths and weaknesses. She felt more informed and confident, and knew that she was on the right track.
    • Statistic: According to a study by Kaiser Permanente, people who kept a food diary lost twice as much weight as those who did not.
 


1.8 Don’t beat yourself up for occasional slips and learn from your mistakes. 

 
  • Don’t expect perfection or punish yourself for minor setbacks. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might slip and smoke a cigarette once in a while. If you want to lose weight, you might slip and eat a slice of cake once in a while. If you want to finish a project, you might slip and miss a deadline once in a while. Don’t beat yourself up for occasional slips and learn from your mistakes. They are not failures, but opportunities to learn and improve.
    • Example: Jack wanted to finish a project, but he was too hard on himself. He just said “I want to finish a project” and worked on it without any flexibility or forgiveness. He expected perfection and punished himself for minor setbacks. He soon felt guilty and depressed, and lost his self-esteem and motivation. He decided to start over and don’t beat himself up for occasional slips and learn from his mistakes. He said “I want to finish a project in two weeks”. He worked on it with some flexibility and forgiveness. He accepted that he was not perfect and that he might make some mistakes. He learned from his mistakes and improved his skills and strategies. He felt more positive and resilient, and regained his self-esteem and motivation.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the University of Hertfordshire, people who were more forgiving of themselves were more likely to keep their resolutions than those who were not.
 


1.9 Stick to it and be patient and persistent until your resolution becomes a habit. 

 
  • Don’t give up or quit too soon. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might need to stick to it for at least three months before you can say that you are a non-smoker. If you want to lose weight, you might need to stick to it for at least six months before you can see significant results. If you want to finish a project, you might need to stick to it for at least a month before you can see the final product. Stick to it and be patient and persistent until your resolution becomes a habit. It takes time and effort to change your behavior and achieve your goal, but it is worth it.
    • Example: Anna wanted to lose weight, but she gave up too soon. She just said “I want to lose weight” and followed a diet and exercise plan. She didn’t stick to it or be patient and persistent. She expected to see immediate results and quit after a few weeks. She decided to start over and stick to it and be patient and persistent. She said “I want to lose 20 pounds in six months”. She followed a diet and exercise plan that was realistic and suitable for her. She didn’t expect to see instant results and stuck to it for six months. She saw gradual and steady improvement and reached her goal. She felt more satisfied and proud, and maintained her weight loss.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the University College London, it takes an average of 66 days to form a new habit.
 


1.10 Keep trying and don’t give up if you face setbacks or difficulties. 

 
  • Don’t let one bad day or one bad week ruin your resolution. For example, if you want to quit smoking, you might relapse and smoke a pack of cigarettes one day. If you want to lose weight, you might binge and eat a whole pizza one day. If you want to finish a project, you might fall behind and miss a milestone one day. Keep trying and don’t give up if you face setbacks or difficulties. They are not the end of the world, but part of the journey. You can always start again and do better the next day.
    • Example: Mark wanted to finish a project, but he faced some setbacks and difficulties. He just said “I want to finish a project” and worked on it without any contingency or resilience. He let one bad day or one bad week ruin his resolution. He faced some technical issues, some personal problems, and some unexpected changes. He got frustrated and angry, and gave up on his project. He decided to start over and keep trying and don’t give up if he faced setbacks or difficulties. He said “I want to finish a project in four weeks”. He worked on it with some contingency and resilience. He expected some challenges and changes, and dealt with them calmly and creatively. He didn’t let one bad day or one bad week stop him from working on his project. He kept trying and doing his best, and finished his project successfully.
    • Statistic: According to a study by the University of Scranton, people who persisted in their resolutions after facing setbacks were 10 times more likely to achieve them than those who did not.
 
Unlock your resolution success with the perfect companion! Explore this exclusive journal designed to help you achieve your goals effortlessly. Click here to grab yours now and turn your resolutions into reality!
NORSE WISDOM
QUOTES JOURNAL 

 

2. Conclusion

In this article, we have provided you with a comprehensive guide to help you set and keep your resolutions. We have shared with you 10 science-backed tips and strategies that will help you overcome the common challenges and pitfalls that prevent you from achieving your goals. We have also given you some examples, stories, statistics, and resources to inspire and motivate you along the way.

We hope that this article has helped you to create a clear and effective plan to make your resolutions a reality. We also hope that this article has helped you to gain a better understanding of yourself and your potential. You are ready to start the new year with a new you.

If you need some additional resources or links for further guidance or inspiration, here are some that we recommend:

 

We also invite you to subscribe to our newsletter, share this article on social media, or comment on your resolution below. We would love to hear from you and support you in your journey.

Thank you for reading this article. We wish you a happy and successful new year. 😊


3. FAQ

Here are some frequently asked questions and answers about resolutions:

  • Q: How many resolutions should I make?
  • A: There is no definitive answer to this question, but we suggest that you make one or two resolutions that are most important or urgent for you. Making too many resolutions can be overwhelming and distracting, and reduce your chances of success. Making one or two resolutions can help you focus your efforts and resources, and increase your chances of success.
  • Q: How can I make my resolutions more specific and measurable?
  • A: A good way to make your resolutions more specific and measurable is to use the SMART framework. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-bound. For example, instead of saying “I want to be healthier”, you can say “I want to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables every day for three months”. This resolution is specific (what, how, and when), measurable (five servings), achievable (not too hard or easy), relevant (related to your health), and time-bound (three months).
  • Q: What are some common obstacles and temptations that might derail my progress?
  • A: Some common obstacles and temptations that might derail your progress are stress, boredom, social pressure, cravings, holidays, parties, and changes in your routine or environment. These factors can make you want to quit or cheat on your resolution, and undo your hard work. To overcome them, you need to plan ahead and anticipate them, and prepare some coping strategies, such as avoiding, replacing, distracting, or rewarding yourself.

Unlock your resolution success with the perfect companion! Explore this exclusive journal designed to help you achieve your goals effortlessly. Click here to grab yours now and turn your resolutions into reality!
 NORSE WISDOM
 QUOTES JOURNAL 


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